Construction Towing in 6th Hot Weekend

Marsh Sucks in Backhoe and Requires Construction Towing Despite Hot Weather

Tim’s Towing & Recovery (912) 964-6773

The beastly weather doesn’t mean our Savannah marshes are drying up – at least not yet. Last Thursday, a marsh on Wilmington Island grabbed onto a backhoe in the middle of a small construction project and refused to let go without a fight.

Tim’s Towing and Recovery was called and found the backhoe bogged down on its right side up to the axle, nearly tipping over and required true heavy duty towing. The back half of the backhoe was nestled up tight against the marsh, its front shovel resting in the overgrowth of a grassy field. The situation was complicated by a large stand of trees, 200 yards away, preventing any rescue vehicles from getting closer.

Moving an 18,000 pound backhoe from a distance of 200 feet required a 35-ton construction towing truck. Through a combination of winches and chains, the backhoe was extracted from the marsh.

The birds watching from nearby trees cheered with loud tweets when the backhoe finally left their neighborhood. Congratulations on another challenging job well done by Tm’s Towing and Recovery.

Construction Towing Savannah Stuck Backhoe

Construction Towing Savannah Stuck Backhoe

Construction Towing Savannah Getting Ready

Construction Towing Savannah Getting Ready

Details of Construction Towing

Tim’s Towing and Recovery dispatch was notified of the situation. A construction equipment towing operator arrived driving a 35-ton construction tow truck. The construction towing specialist quickly assessed the situation. He saw that the backhoe, recently engaged in a residential property project, was sitting next to a marsh on Wilmington Island. One of the backhoe’s axles was mired in the soft mud in a grassy area along a nearby marsh causing the equipment to tilt heavily to the right. The construction towing truck couldn’t approach from behind, as the marsh and high grasses were in the way. The other side was blocked by palm trees. The best available option was to winch out the backhoe from behind the palm trees and move it to solid ground.

The Tim’s Towing and Recovery construction equipment towing operator uncoiled the winch cable over the 200 foot distance between the construction towing truck and the backhoe. He hooked up chains to apply the force evenly to the backhoe avoiding a potential tumble once he started winching it in. The next step was to slowly pull the winch cable taught and begin steadily inching the backhoe out of the muddy marsh bed. Over the course of forty-five minutes, the 35-ton construction towing truck and construction equipment towing specialist carefully maneuvered the backhoe out of the mud. The entire off-road recovery was successfully accomplished in under an hour.

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